Please reload

Recent Posts

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Featured Posts

Caregiving Knowledge I wish I Had Known (Part 1 of 7)

September 13, 2017

Who hasn’t heard the expression “hindsight is 20/20”? I think we all have. It certainly applies when it comes to family caregiving. Looking back on the last season of my beloved mother's life, I would have done some things differently— no doubt about it.

 

I’d like to share something personal with you. I often spend precious time these days reminiscing, thinking “If only I knew then what I know now about caregiving!” Like many former caregivers, I’m haunted by the notion that I might carry my guilt from those caregiving years to my grave. I don’t know about you, but when I’m drowning in my could-have, should-have, and would-have moments, I eventually force myself to come up for air to face the truth. My truth: I did my absolute best! And my best was based on what I knew and understood at the time.

 

As much as I would love to, I can’t go back and change anything. However, sharing my candid insights may make a difference for you— or someone you know. So, whether you’re are a current or future family caregiver or a curious reader, I hope you benefit from my list of seven things I wish I had known during my caregiving journey.  

 

1.  Wish I’d had the caregiving conversation earlier

 

The closest I came to having a caregiving conversation with Mama Peaches was brief dialogues based on preparation for her death. For as long as I could remember, Mama would sporadically remind me of her end-of-life wishes as

 

 

well as where to find the insurance policy. And for as long as I can remember, I would strategically orchestrate a dance around the subject, avoiding it as much as possible. Why should we talk about something like that? After all, Mama was a long way from dying— or so I convinced myself.

 

Mama was always reasonably healthy; therefore, we never really talked about the notion of caregiving. To us, life consisted of two phrases: living and dying. I, personally, had no idea that there could be three phases – living, needing care, and dying.

 

In hindsight, if I had known that those years of needing care were ahead of us, our conversations would have definitely been different. Not just a matter of life and death—both of us would have discussed her care.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Check back next week for the next thing I wish I had know.  For a complete listing, please reference my new caregiving book called Mama Peaches Hot Slices of Wisdom available October 1st on Amazon.

 

For more caregiving news you can use join our informational Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/CHANEYspeaks.

 

 

 

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Follow Us
Please reload

Search By Tags